News

October, 11th 2011
The AGU fall meeting 2011 will take place in San Francisco between December 5th and December 9th.
November, 2nd 2010
The EGU general assembly will take place in Vienna, Austria between April 3rd and April 8th 2011. The deadline for abstract submission is 10th of january 2011

October, 22nd 2010
A Date need to be chosen for the 2 days StraPolÉté annual meeting in Orléans in January 2011. Check your emails to get the link to access the Doodle.

October, 21st 2010
Two oral presentations and one poster on the StraPolÉté project have been accepted for AGU fall meeting 2011 which will take place in San Francisco.
  • One talk to present StraPolÉté project and preliminary results of studies associated
  • One talk entitled "On the occurrence‚ the characterization and the dynamical processes associated to FrIAC’s events"

August, 16th 2010
The AGU fall meeting 2010 will take place in San Francisco between December 13th and December 17th. The deadline for abstract submission is 2nd of September 2010

January, 26th 2010
The 12th Symposium of the International Commission on Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Pollutuion (CACGP) and the 11 th Science Conference of the International Global Atmosphere Chemistry (IGAC) Project will take place in Halifax, Canada between July 11th and July 16th 2010.
The deadline for abstract submission is 15th of March 2010.

The 38th COSPAR Scientific Assembly will be held between the 18th and the 25th of July 2010 in Bremen, Germany.
The Deadline for abstract submission is 19 February 2010.

December, 16th 2009
The EGU general assembly will take place in Vienna, Austria between May 2nd and May 7th 2010. The deadline for abstract submission is 18th of january 2010

The Oslo science conference of the international polar year will be held between the 8th and the 12th of June. The deadline for abstract submission is 20th of January 2010

December, 15th 2009
The annual meeting of the StraPolÉté project will take place at LPC2E in Orléans on Wednesday the 20th and Thursday the 21st of January 2010.

It will be dedicated mainly to the first results and preliminary intrepretations of the measurements obtained during the StraPolÉté Campaign last August.

September, 9th 2009
The scientific flight LPMA/DOAS/mini–DOAS/STAC of the StraPolÉté campaign took place on Monday/Tuesday September 7/8 with a launch from Esrange (67.9ºN, 21.1ºE) near Kiruna and a flight covering the period 14:50 UT to 06:07 UT the following morning (16h50–08h07 local time).

The LPMA (Limb Profile Monitor of the Atmosphere) instrument is a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer operating in solar absorption and covering 4 spectral intervals between 14.3 and 2.4 µm (700 to 4130 cm-1) at a resolution of 0.02 cm-1 (corresponding to a maximum optical path difference of 50 cm). These intervals cover the spectral signatures (grouped by channel) of HNO3, O3, N2O, CH4; NO, H2O; NO2, HCl, CH4; HF, H2O. The solar radiation is fed into the interferometer by a sun–tracker, which is shared between LPMA and DOAS (see below). The sun–tracker plays a very important role (together with the primary azimuth control of the gondola, which is operated by the CNES team "Nacelles pointées") since it is allowing solar pointing during ascent, at float before sunset and had sunrise, as achieved during this flight. Real time telemetry data showed that the recorded stratospheric spectra are of high quality and that their inversion will produce reliable mixing ratio profiles of the listed species which will document the "reference state" of the summer polar stratosphere, one of the scientific objectives of StraPolÉté.

The DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) instrument observes direct sun–light in the UV and visible spectral range. Measurements were taken during the ascent of the balloon, at float, the sunset on Monday evening, and during the sunrise on the following morning. The main targeted species were O3, NO2, and BrO.

One important return from the joint flight of these two instruments collecting solar radiation sharing exactly the same atmospheric path is the direct comparison of slant columns of O3 and NO2. Another aspect of this balloon mission is the study of the diurnal variation of photo-chemically active species like NO2 and NO.

Additionally, two small versatile UV/visible spectrometer (referred to as "mini–DOAS") were deployed on the same gondola and observed scattered skylight in limb scattering geometry. One mini–DOAS was operated in fixed limb and nadir geometry, while the second mini–DOAS instrument (OSKAR) measured in limb scanning mode. Limb scanning offers the advantage of recording the diurnal variation of profiles of the targeted trace–gases.

STAC is an aerosol counter that can measure the size distribution and the concentration of aerosols from the middle troposphere up to the middle stratosphere. The lower size that can be detected for liquid particles is 0.32 µm, and the largest (solid) particles that can be detected have diameters of about 5 µm. Measurements are conducted during ascent, at float and during descent. STAC has worked successfully during the flight. The vertical profiles of concentrations and the size distribution of aerosols will be available soon after the end of the campaign.

August, 27th 2009
For the last three days, the Strapolété campaign has sped up with three successful balloon flights operated by CNES from Esrange (67.9ºN, 21.1ºE) near Kiruna (Sweden).

After a first flight on 7 August, the second flight of SPIRALE (LPC2E) instrument took place on Monday 24 August from 20:30 to 02:10 UT (22h30–4h10 local time). This infrared absorption spectrometer with six laser diodes performed in situ measurements of trace gases (O3, CO, OCS, CH4, N2O, NO2, HNO3, HCl) from 9 km to 34 km during the ascent, the ceiling and the slow descent of the balloon.

The SALOMON–N2 instrument (LPC2E) was launched on August 25th around 15 UT (17H local time). For the first time the sun was used as light source with the aim to detect the UV spectral absorption of BrO. Visible spectra were also obtained for observations of O3, NO2 and aerosol extinction coefficient. Observations were conducted during the balloon ascent and at float altitude (around 36 km) with sun elevation angles ranging from about 13º to –5.5º ensuring a scanning of the atmosphere down to 7 km altitude.

The Elhysa instrument was flown on August 26th successfully providing an in situ vertical profile of water vapour. It is the second time over the past 20 years that the stratospheric water vapour amounts are obtained by Elhysa in the summer high latitude conditions.

For the three flights, the STAC instrument was implemented onboard the payloads and measured the size distribution and concentration of aerosols (liquid and/or solid) having size in the 0.35–5 micrometer size range. The measurements were performed during the ascent, at float, during slow descent, and finally during the descent under parachutes, in the same altitude ranges.

The recovery of SPIRALE and SALOMON–N2 was made at less than 50 km from the launching base with no damage on the instruments.

August, 20th 2009
On Thursday the 20th of August 2009, between 14:00 and 15:00 Nathalie Huret, the Coordinator of the STRAPOLETÉ project, will be interviewed from the Esrange launch base in Sweden by Fabienne Chauvière during the "Tout s’explique" live broadcast on the France Inter radio.

August, 18th 2009
The scientific flight MicroRADIBAL/STAC of the StraPolÉté campaign took place on Tuesday 18 August with a launch from Esrange (67.9ºN, 21.1ºE) near Kiruna (Sweden) and a flight from 13:22 to 20:30 UT (15h22–22h30 local time).

MicroRADIBAL measured radiance and polarization of the scattered sunlight in five channels in the near infrared (730 to 1620 nm) during the ceiling of the balloon at about 31 km and during the slow descent from about 31 km to 17 km. The rotation of the gondola around the vertical axis enables to obtain diagrams versus scattering angle that will be processed to characterize stratospheric aerosols (spectral extinction coefficients, size distribution, surface area density…).

STAC particle counter measures the size distribution and concentration of aerosols (liquid and/or solid) having size in the 0.35–5 micrometer size range. The measurements were performed during the ascent, at float, during slow descent, and finally during the descent under parachutes, in the 5 – 31 km altitude range. The instrument worked nominally.

The recovery of the payload was made in Finland, close to the border, the day after in the morning.

August, 14th 2009
The technological and scientific flight SWIR–balloon/STAC of the StraPolEté campaign took place on Friday 14 August with a launch from Esrange (67.9ºN, 21.1ºE) near Kiruna and a flight covering the period 09:26 to 15:24 UT (11h26–17h24 local time).

This was the first flight of the LPMAA Fourier transform spectrometer in the so–called SWIR or shortwave infrared configuration, covering bands around 2.3 and 2.0 µm in addition to two other bands around 4.8 and 3.3 µm in the thermal infrared (TIR) at a spectral resolution of 0.1 cm-1 for tropospheric sounding.

The SWIR is the spectral region covered by the Japanese satellite GOSAT for measuring CO2 from space. The present SWIR–balloon was performed in good space and time coincidence with a GOSAT overpass at 12:59 UT when the payload was at float and well stabilized.

Many TIR and SWIR spectra as well as images (in the thermal infrared and visible) of the surface/atmosphere/cloud system have been recorded in the nadir viewing geometry. They will be processed in the next days for retrieving the abundances of atmospheric species related to the carbon cycle: CO, CO2 and CH4, as well as surface and cloud parameters.

STAC is an aerosol counter that can measure the size distribution and the concentration of aerosols from the middle troposphere up to the middle stratosphere. The lower size that can be detected for liquid particles is 0.32 µm, and the largest (solid) particles that can be detected have diameters of about 5 µm. Measurements are conducted during ascent, at float and during descent. STAC has worked successfully during the flight. The vertical profiles of concentrations and the size distribution of aerosols will be available soon after the end of the campaign.

The cut was commanded by CNES balloon operations at 15:24 UT.

The recovery of the payload, with no damage, was made in the North of the Esrange perimeter in the evening of the same day.

A second flight of this payload (in the solar occultation configuration) is planned in about 10 days.

August, 7th 2009
The second scientific flight of the StraPolEté campaign took place on Friday 7 August from 01:25 to 06:40 UT (3h25-8h40 local) near Kiruna (67.9°N, 21.1°E).

The infrared absorption spectrometer with six laser diodes SPIRALE (LPC2E) performed in situ measurements of trace gases (O3, CO, CH4, N2O, NO2, HNO3, HCl) from 9 km to 34 km during the ascent, the ceiling and the slow descent of the balloon.

The STAC instrument implemented onboard the SPIRALE gondola performed in situ measurements of aerosols.

The recovery of the instruments, with little damage, was made on the south west of Kiruna during the same day.

The third flight of the scientific campaign is planned in few days.

August, 4th 2009
The StraPolété campaign has started.

The first flight of the StraPolÉté campaign (opening flight) took place on Sunday 02 August at 18:00 UT. The hygrometer ELHYSA and the aerosol counter STAC from the LPC2E were on this flight. The flight duration was 4H. The recovery of the instruments was made on the south west of Kiruna.

The first scientific flight of the campaign with the SPIRALE instrument and STAC as a piggy back is planned in few days.


Supported by ANR decision BLAN08–1_316271
©January 2009 -
Marc-Antoine Drouin
Last update 11/16/2011